Kashi Blueberry Waffles Review

Kashi Blueberry Waffles

While people often think about modern brands like Eggo when they imagine waffles, this breakfast dish has actually been around since the 14th century. The oldest known waffle recipe was published in Le Ménagier de Paris, a French medieval guidebook from 1393. Today, consumers have all kinds of waffle options, like Kashi Blueberry Waffles, a reasonably healthy breakfast choice.

Even though frozen waffles are traditionally prepared in the toaster, you can actually heat these waffles without using a toaster at all. The waffles come with oven instructions, which only take about 6 minutes. No matter how you wind up cooking these waffles, they’ll be crispy and ready to eat in no time at all.

Kashi Blueberry Waffles

These Kashi waffles are made from 7-grain whole grain flour, and you can definitely taste the difference. They’re less sweet than your standard waffle, even when you take the blueberries into account, but a little bit of maple syrup should take care of that problem. If you don’t like overly sweet waffles, a scoop of butter might be all you want to add to this dish.

What really sets this apart from similar dishes is the quality of the blueberries. Kashi uses wild blueberries in their waffles, and you can taste the difference. The actual waffles couldn’t pass for homemade, but the blueberries taste like they were freshly picked. Since the blueberries provide most of the sweetness here, the waffles are very low in sugar; there are just 3 grams per serving.

These waffles can’t compare to homemade waffles, and they’re probably pretty different from the waffles people enjoyed in medieval France, but they’re still a nice breakfast treat. Kashi Blueberry Waffles are a healthier take on frozen waffles, and they’re a pretty good way to satisfy your cravings for fresh blueberries.

To learn more about the nutrition content or ingredients in these Kashi frozen waffles, check out our package scan below.

Kashi Blueberry Waffles